Cedar Valley Realtor

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 58 people, 28 households, and 19 families residing in the city. The population density was 117.2 people per square mile (45.7/km2). There were 30 housing units at an average density of 60.6 per square mile (23.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 87.93% White, 5.17% Native American, 1.72% from other races, and 5.17% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.45% of the population. There were 28 households out of which 21.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.7% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.1% were non-families. 28.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.07 and the average family size was 2.53. In the city the population was spread out with 15.5% under the age of 18, 1.7% from 18 to 24, 17.2% from 25 to 44, 34.5% from 45 to 64, and 31.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 56 years. For every 100 females there were 100.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.5 males. The median income for a household in the city was $53,125, and the median income for a family was $54,375. Males had a median income of $60,833 versus $41,250 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,766. None of the population and none of the families were below the poverty line. The poverty threshold, or poverty line, is the minimum level of income deemed adequate in a given country.[1] In practice, like the definition of poverty, the official or common understanding of the poverty line is significantly higher in developed countries than in developing countries.[2][3] The common international poverty line has in the past been roughly $1 a day.[4] In 2008, th World Bank came out with a revised figure of $1.25 at 2005 purchasing-power parity (PPP).[5] Determining the poverty line is usually done by finding the total cost of all the essential resources that an average human adult consumes in one year.[6] The largest of these expenses is typically the rent required to live in an apartment, so historically, economists have paid particular attention to the real estate market and housing prices as a strong poverty line affector. Individual factors are often used to account for various circumstances, such as whether one is a parent, elderly, a child, married, etc. The poverty threshold may be adjusted annually. Per capita income is often used as average income, a measure of the wealth of the population of a nation, particularly in comparison to other nations. It is usually expressed in terms of a commonly used international currency such as the Euro or United States dollar, and is useful because it is widely known, easily calculated from readily-available GDP and population estimates, and produces a useful statistic for comparison of wealth between sovereign territories. Critics claim that per capita income has several weaknesses as an accurate measurement of prosperity: Comparisons of per capita income over time need to take into account changes in prices. Without using measures of income adjusted for inflation, they will tend to overstate the effects of economic growth. International comparisons can be distorted by differences in the costs of living between countries that aren't reflected in exchange rates. Where the objective of the comparison is to look at differences in living standards between countries, using a measure of per capita income adjusted for differences in purchasing power parity more accurately reflects the differences in what people are actually able to buy with their money.