Cedar Valley Realtor

Business sector

With the development of private property ownership, real estate has become a major area of business, commonly referred to as commercial real estate. Purchasing real estate requires a significant investment, and each parcel of land has unique characteristics, so the real estate industry has evolved into several distinct fields. Specialists are often called on to valuate real estate and facilitate transactions. Some kinds of real estate businesses include: Appraisal: Professional valuation services Brokerages: A mediator who charges a fee to facilitate a real estate transaction between the two parties. Development: Improving land for use by adding or replacing buildings Net leasing Property management: Managing a property for its owner(s) Real estate marketing: Managing the sales side of the property business Real estate investing: Managing the investment of real estate Relocation services: Relocating people or business to a different country Corporate Real Estate: Managing the real estate held by a corporation to support its core businessЧunlike managing the real estate held by an investor to generate income Within each field, a business may specialize in a particular type of real estate, such as residential, commercial, or industrial property. In addition, almost all construction business effectively has a connection to real estate. Professional university-level education in real estate is primarily focused at the graduate level. Focus in towards the commercial real estate sector, primarily real estate development or investment rather than residential real estate sales conducted by a Realtor. See also graduate real estate education for a discussion and list of university-level real estate programs. "Internet real estate" is a term coined by the internet investment community relating to ownership of domain names and the similarities between high quality internet domain names and real-world, prime real estate. Ownership of property may be private, collective, or common and the property may be objects, land/real estate or intellectual property. Determining ownership in

aw involves determining who has certain rights and duties over the property. These rights and duties, sometimes called a 'bundle of rights', can be separated and held by different parties. The question of ownership reaches back to the ancient philosophers, Plato and Aristotle, who held different opinions on the subject. Plato (428/427BC-348/347BC) thought private property created divisive inequalities, while Aristotle (384BC-322BC) thought private property enabled people to receive the full benefit of their labor. Private property also circumvents what is now referred to as the Уtragedy of the commonsФ problem, where people tend to degrade common property more than they do private property. While Aristotle justified the existence of private ownership, he left open questions of (1) how to allocate property between what is private and common and (2) how to allocate the private property within society.[1] Over the millennia, and across cultures what can be property and how it is regarded culturally have varied widely. Ownership is the basis for many other concepts that form the foundations of ancient and modern societies such as money, trade, debt, bankruptcy, the criminality of theft and private vs. public property. Ownership is the key building block in the development of the capitalist socio-economic system. Adam Smith stated that one of the sacred laws of justice was to guard a person's property and possessions.[2] The process and mechanics of ownership are fairly complex: one can gain, transfer and lose ownership of property in a number of ways. To acquire property one can purchase it with money, trade it for other property, receive it as a gift, steal it, find it, make it or homestead it. One can transfer or lose ownership of property by selling it for money, exchanging it for other property, giving it as a gift, being robbed of it, misplacing it, or having it stripped from one's ownership through legal means such as eviction, foreclosure, seizure or taking. Ownership is self-propagating in that the owner of any property will also own the economic benefits of that property.